Monday, July 31, 2017

President Trump Speaks on Treatment of Suspects by Police

In a recent speech on how to handle gang violence, President Trump suggested that the need to protect suspects from injury during arrest should not be of primary concern to law enforcement. ("Trump to Police: 'Please Don't Be Too Nice' to Suspects," ABC News, July 28, 2017). "When you see these thugs being thrown into the back of a paddy wagon, you just seen them thrown in, rough. I said, 'Please don’t be too nice,'" he said. Trump expressed similar sentiments in the past when confronted with individuals speaking against him in a public forum, "Get him out," he said of a protester. "Try not to hurt him. If you do, I'll defend you in court. Don't worry about it."

Review selected hard copy/online library books related to treatment of suspects by police at LSC-CyFair Branch Library. Click the title of a listed item, select the "Place Hold" button in the listing, and enter your library card number and PIN for each title you want to request for pick up at the library.

Use these subject words and phrases to find more information in the library catalog:
  • law enforcement ethical
  • police brutality
  • police-community relations
  • police corruption
  • police misconduct
  • police shootings
  • police United States
  • racial profiling
Police Use of Force: Important Issues Facing the Police and the Communities They Serve edited by Michael Palmiotto
CRC Press, 2017
call number: 363.232 Pol (on order)

"Police Use of Force presents readers with critical and timely issues facing police and the communities they serve when police encounters turn violent. Dr. Palmiotto offers in-depth coverage of the use of force, deadly force, non-lethal weapons, militarization of policing, racism and profiling, legal cases, psychology, perception and training, and violence prevention." - publisher's summary excerpt

Scribner, 2017
call number: 363.209 Cam

"From 1996 through 2014 Charles Campisi headed NYPD's Internal Affairs Bureau, working under four police commissioners and gaining a reputation as hard-nosed and incorruptible. When he retired, only one man on the 36,000-member force had served longer. During Campisi's IAB tenure, the number of New Yorkers shot, wounded, or killed by cops every year declined by ninety percent, and the number of cops failing integrity tests shrank to an equally startling low. But to achieve those exemplary results, Campisi had to triple IAB's staff, hire the very best detectives, and put the word out that bad apples wouldn't be tolerated…Blue on Blue puts us in the scene, allowing us to listen in on wiretaps and feel the adrenaline rush of drawing in the net. It also reveals new threats to the force, such as the possibility of infiltration by terrorists." - publisher's summary excerpt


Black and Blue: Inside the Divide Between the Police and Black America by Jeff Pegues
Prometheus Books, 2017
call number: 363.208 Peg

"CBS News Justice and Homeland Security Correspondent Jeff Pegues provides unbiased facts, statistics, and perspectives from both sides of the community-police divide…How do police officers perceive the people of color who live in high-crime areas? How are they viewed by the communities that they police? Pegues explores these questions and more through interviews not only with police chiefs, but also officers on the ground, both black and white. In addition, he goes to the front lines of the debate as crime spikes in some of the nation's major cities…Turning to possible solutions, the author summarizes the best recommendations from police chiefs, politicians, and activists. Readers will not only be informed but learn what they can do about tensions with police in their communities." - publisher's summary excerpt

To Protect and Serve: How to Fix America's Police by Norm Stamper
Nation Books, 2016
call number: 363.209 Sta

"Former Seattle Police Chief Norm Stamper delivers a revolutionary new model for American law enforcement: the community-based police department. It calls for fundamental changes in the federal government's role in local policing as well as citizen participation in all aspects of police operations: policymaking, program development, crime fighting and service delivery, entry-level and ongoing education and training, oversight of police conduct, and--especially relevant to today's challenges--joint community-police crisis management. Nothing will ever change until the system itself is radically restructured, and here Stamper shows us how." - publisher's summary excerpt

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